ABOUT

Joe Patitucci
Exploration, Discovery & Connection

I believe that humans need the unknown.
I believe that everything we experience and everything we learn is simply a projection of our own sense of reality at a given time. With that, I believe that humans have an innate need to experience acquiring our own sense of reality in order to advance our consciousness. We need the freedom to explore, to own the experience of the discoveries we make and to have the opportunity to connect those discoveries to ideas larger than ourselves. A central part of my work is the creation of opportunities for wayfinding and self-exploration through semi-controlled environments in which I see my audience as participants in a ritual of self-discovery. By designing a safe space for play that is non-linear responsive to the user I work to empower participants to make their own discoveries.

 

SOLVING BIG, DIFFICULT, AND LONG-TERM PROBLEMS

 interactions welcomed by a safe place for play responsive systems the non-linear arrangement of stimuli, I invite participants to make their own connection work and through social media, I invite participants to extend their experience to a greater understanding of mental, physical and digital space as well as community.

 

  Plant sonification at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Plant sonification at the Philadelphia Museum of Art


APPROACH

I’ve come to realize that for my own physical and emotional health that I need to be way out there.

not defined by discipline

Sound design, music, marketing, experience design, connector, innovator
READY TO GROW!

unique and iconoclastic experience

  • plant music
  • music performance
  • project management
  • Print design

While softly closing my eyes during a candle meditation to the sound of a beating drum, I experience threads of light making shape-shifting 3D structures inside of my head. I feel as if I am fully occupying this imaginary space - laying in a room inside – a sort of sacred space. I go on to consider the factors contributing to this experience. I feel into my body’s response to experiencing the beating drum. I feel the muscles on my face, specifically those around my forehead and temple relax. I acknowledge the likelyhood that the aperture of my pupil is large in this dim environment. I notice how my pupils are veiled horizontally by my eyelids and vertically by my eye lashes and the way the meniscus of the fluid of my eye distorts what’s left of the light. And then I realize…

I can build this! I know what it would take to begin building a simulation of this experience so that others can enter a shape-shifting sanctuary of candle meditation. The biofeedback technology needed to measure the phenomena related to most of the variables I’ve identified already exists. A simulation of this experience controlled by the physical response of a viewer is possible.

Where does this come from?

My body’s response to listening to the beating of a drum
The release of muscle tension in my face
The wide aperture of my pupils mostly veiled by my eyelids and eyelashes
The way my these variables seemed to shift along with the pattern of my beating heart.
My next thought was. The biofeedback technology associated with these variables exists. I can build this! I can build a room that allows other people to experience what I experienced in this candle meditation – to use technology to facilitate relaxation.

What is the value of this?

I knew that while this was a perceived reality that it wasn’t necessarily a reality that could be
Make more park space accessible by creating a boat club

style, and points of view.

(see Ignite video)

Life as infrastructure

We all think we know what nature sounds like. It’s birds chirping, wind through trees, thunder echoing through the valley. These are all sounds that come from physical phenomena in nature, producing waves perceivable by the human ear: the need to mate, currents of air and water, static electricity. There are other phenomena in our natural environment, however, that produce information which we cannot perceive through our biological senses.

The course of human history has been moving towards advanced technology which enhances our ability to observe the world beyond these faculties. As stone tools were a way for us to expand our physical strength, electronic tools expand our ability to perceive phenomena previously outside of the human experience.

Digital technology has become a natural extension of our human senses. With it, we are not just gaining the ability to observe new information. We are revealing new patterns of creative expression. These revelations raise questions about our own place in a Universe filled with natural elegance.

Moving towards the digital world. Instead of renouncing it as incompatible with meditation / physical and spiritual wellness, work to improve the ergonomics of digital space and the relationship between our bodies and digital technology.


EXPERIENCE

ENGINEERING ACCOMPLISHMENT, SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENT, DESIGN INNOVATION OR ARTISTIC ACCOMPLISHMENT.

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INVENTION, DISCOVERY AND EXPRESSION.

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IMPACT

“Hearing you for the first time on NPR in conjunction with a story of how Native Americans refer to all things as living really changed my view of plants and the world around us. I really can’t thank you enough for that.”

INVENTION OF NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES THAT RADICALLY IMPROVE THE WAYS PEOPLE LIVE, LEARN, WORK, AND PLAY.

Combine tools

How to use biofeedback music to induce lucid dreaming

How we can bring our dream realities into physical reality

How we can use technology to achieve deep relaxation

YOU MAKE THINGS THAT MATTER. IMPACT IS KEY.


BEING DEEPLY VERSED IN A MINIMUM OF TWO FIELDS, PREFERABLY NOT ONES NORMALLY JUXTAPOSED

Sound + experience design.


BEING AN ORTHOGONAL AND COUNTER-INTUITIVE THINKER, EVEN A MISFIT WITHIN NORMAL STRUCTURES

I think I was drawn to study Anthropology because I am so accustomed to feeling like I’m visiting

Just visiting Earth

  • Feeling out of place in aggressive environments.
  • Wanting to do things more slowly
  • Staring at reflections

Things I enjoy

  •  Finding paintings in reflections of water
  • Thinking about spacetime while playing ice hockey
  •  Using my ears as mirrors while riding my bicycle
  • Sleeping.
  • off the chart - making connections. showing connections that exist. revealing things we can experience as existing but do not yet understand


I feel people as places
Are mirrored buildings amenities provided by corporations so that office workers might be able to experience the sky in dense cities?

HAVING A FEARLESS PERSONALITY, BOUNDLESS OPTIMISM, AND DESIRE TO CHANGE THE WORLD.

I would like for for trans and post-humans to outlive the only solar system we’ve called home. I understand that this requires our commitment both to space exploration as well as conservation. Respecting what we have. - creating opportunities for people to experience what we have.

WHY MEDIA LAB?

Actively promoting a unique, antidisciplinary culture, the MIT Media Lab goes beyond known boundaries and disciplines, encouraging the most unconventional mixing and matching of seemingly disparate research areas. It creates disruptive technologies that happen at the edges, pioneering such areas as wearable computing, tangible interfaces, and affective computing. Today, faculty members, research staff, and students at the Lab work in more than 25 research groups on more than 350 projects that range from digital approaches for treating neurological disorders, to a stackable, electric car for sustainable cities, to advanced imaging technologies that can “see around a corner.” The Lab is committed to looking beyond the obvious to ask the questions not yet asked–questions whose answers could radically improve the way people live, learn, express themselves, work, and play.


My body’s response to listening to the beating of a drum
The release of muscle tension in my face
The wide aperture of my pupils mostly veiled by my eyelids and eyelashes
The way my these variables seemed to shift along with the pattern of my beating heart.
My next thought was. The biofeedback technology associated with these variables exists. I can build this! I can build a room that allows other people to experience what I experienced in this candle meditation – to use technology to facilitate relaxation.

What is the value of this?

I knew that while this was a perceived reality that it wasn’t necessarily a reality that could be
Make more park space accessible by creating a boat club

style, and points of view.

(see Ignite video)

Life as infrastructure

We all think we know what nature sounds like. It’s birds chirping, wind through trees, thunder echoing through the valley. These are all sounds that come from physical phenomena in nature, producing waves perceivable by the human ear: the need to mate, currents of air and water, static electricity. There are other phenomena in our natural environment, however, that produce information which we cannot perceive through our biological senses.

The course of human history has been moving towards advanced technology which enhances our ability to observe the world beyond these faculties. As stone tools were a way for us to expand our physical strength, electronic tools expand our ability to perceive phenomena previously outside of the human experience.

Digital technology has become a natural extension of our human senses. With it, we are not just gaining the ability to observe new information. We are revealing new patterns of creative expression. These revelations raise questions about our own place in a Universe filled with natural elegance.

Moving towards the digital world. Instead of renouncing it as incompatible with meditation / physical and spiritual wellness, work to improve the ergonomics of digital space and the relationship between our bodies and digital technology.


EXPERIENCE

ENGINEERING ACCOMPLISHMENT, SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENT, DESIGN INNOVATION OR ARTISTIC ACCOMPLISHMENT.

asdfasdfasd

INVENTION, DISCOVERY AND EXPRESSION.

asdfasd

IMPACT

“Hearing you for the first time on NPR in conjunction with a story of how Native Americans refer to all things as living really changed my view of plants and the world around us. I really can’t thank you enough for that.”

INVENTION OF NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES THAT RADICALLY IMPROVE THE WAYS PEOPLE LIVE, LEARN, WORK, AND PLAY.

Combine tools

How to use biofeedback music to induce lucid dreaming

How we can bring our dream realities into physical reality

How we can use technology to achieve deep relaxation

YOU MAKE THINGS THAT MATTER. IMPACT IS KEY.


BEING DEEPLY VERSED IN A MINIMUM OF TWO FIELDS, PREFERABLY NOT ONES NORMALLY JUXTAPOSED

Sound + experience design.


BEING AN ORTHOGONAL AND COUNTER-INTUITIVE THINKER, EVEN A MISFIT WITHIN NORMAL STRUCTURES

I think I was drawn to study Anthropology because I am so accustomed to feeling like I’m visiting

Just visiting Earth

  • Feeling out of place in aggressive environments.
  • Wanting to do things more slowly
  • Staring at reflections

Things I enjoy

  •  Finding paintings in reflections of water
  • Thinking about spacetime while playing ice hockey
  •  Using my ears as mirrors while riding my bicycle
  • Sleeping.
  • off the chart - making connections. showing connections that exist. revealing things we can experience as existing but do not yet understand


I feel people as places
Are mirrored buildings amenities provided by corporations so that office workers might be able to experience the sky in dense cities?

HAVING A FEARLESS PERSONALITY, BOUNDLESS OPTIMISM, AND DESIRE TO CHANGE THE WORLD.

I would like for for trans and post-humans to outlive the only solar system we’ve called home. I understand that this requires our commitment both to space exploration as well as conservation. Respecting what we have. - creating opportunities for people to experience what we have.

WHY MEDIA LAB?

Actively promoting a unique, antidisciplinary culture, the MIT Media Lab goes beyond known boundaries and disciplines, encouraging the most unconventional mixing and matching of seemingly disparate research areas. It creates disruptive technologies that happen at the edges, pioneering such areas as wearable computing, tangible interfaces, and affective computing. Today, faculty members, research staff, and students at the Lab work in more than 25 research groups on more than 350 projects that range from digital approaches for treating neurological disorders, to a stackable, electric car for sustainable cities, to advanced imaging technologies that can “see around a corner.” The Lab is committed to looking beyond the obvious to ask the questions not yet asked–questions whose answers could radically improve the way people live, learn, express themselves, work, and play.